Hot answers tagged

19

Technically, a bounty may be reversed or cancelled, if it can be justified... However, the bounty systems acts like an advertisement in the real world. You pay for something to entice visitors/viewers, but there is no guarantee that such an investment will result in people buying more of your product. In a similar vein - the non-real SE world - there is no ...


18

Well, regarding point 1, if you post the bounty on your own question, then, if it is upvoted a lot, you will get a good chunk of rep from that which might well pay back some of the bounty. For example, if you post a 50 points bounty and the question then shoots straight to the top of the homepage and spends a weak on the featured tab, it could easily get 5 ...


17

The reason the step is not very small (say 1) is almost certainly to prevent 'gaming'. The idea of bounties is to give questions a temporary 'boost'. As it stands, you can only do that by using a reasonable amount of rep and having this increase quite rapidly: if you want to bounty a question more than once it gets (relatively) 'expensive'. On the other hand,...


17

Because it is not important. If SE headmasters chose a different sequence that the one we have, it wouldn't change anything. How many people care whether the bounty is 50 or 64, or whether it is 1729 or 2000? It's the scale that show how important it is for you as the offerrer, and not the actual number. Just don't take rep points too seriously and you'll be ...


17

The answer to this is that there is no reputation system on this Meta site to award bounties, and therefore considered by-design. Bounties are only meaningful in an environment where reputation is available to be gained and distributed (through voting, but also bounties). Here on Meta, it does not exist. In fact, your "reputation" on meta is equivalent to ...


14

What about adding an "I'm having that problem too" button? The button could disappear as soon as an answer is accepted. In the meantime, if a question has enough "I'm having that problem" votes (more than 5, say), accepted answers could come with an bonus (and the bonus could increase with the number of votes). This would be similar to a bounty, but wouldn't ...


12

You can't assign more than one bounty to a question at a time. From the Bounty Help: Questions may only have one active question bounty at any given time. Note that you can have more than one active bounty, but these have to be assigned to different questions: Users may only have three active bounties at any given time.


11

They don't want to have the pranks related to putting the bounty and after having the interest pulling it back. Rep points don't mean anyth.... anyways, that's why.


11

No. Bounties are there to give questions additional exposure and are removed from the 'donors' reputation at the point they are set up. Even if the question involved does not gain any answers as a result, the bounty is not returned to the donor. The question will have been 'promoted' by the bounty (there is a dedicated bounty list which is much smaller than ...


11

You do not have enough reputation to add another bounty. You added a 250 rep bounty on December 5th. For you to add another one, you must double the reputation. You do not have 500 reputation to offer such a bounty.


10

If you have already given an answer of your own to a question, the minimum bounty is 100. See: How does the bounty system work? for a full discussion.


10

You have awarded the following bounties already on the post in question: 500 reputation to Gonzalo Medina 500 reputation to Yiannis Lazarides 500 reputation to commonhare 500 reputation to Sam Whited 500 reputation to dcmst 500 reputation to ChrisS 500 reputation to Paul Gessler 1,000 reputation to OSjerick 500 reputation to Thérèse 500 reputation to mrc 2,...


10

Despite the fact that I'm sure all my answers are worth bounties, it seems that the only way to move bounties is for the allegedly undeserving recipient to award a bounty of an equivalent amount to the allegedly more deserving recipient. Accordingly I have started a bounty on the referenced question and will award it once the system allows, later today.


10

I don't want to sound harsh, but bounty is not a way to give reputation to a user for any different reason than the answer which is awarded the bounty. If the problem is that bounty of 500 seems not enough for that particular case (and the offerrer wants to give more reputation to one particular answer), the offerrer can make a feature request to increase ...


9

First of all...Hi! I'm Laura, a product manager at Stack Exchange. The rationale behind having bounty reasons be displayed along with the bounty amount is to help other users know what they should do in order to receive the bounty. You're right about the general reason that bounties exist: people want to do whatever it takes to get an answer. However, since ...


9

The person you are giving as an example has more than 200 reputation on others SE sites, so she or he had a +100 association bonus when coming to TEX S.E. If you add his 17*10 reputations gained for Q&A on this site, +4 for accepting answers and 1 initial point, you have a total of 275 reputations before he offered those three bounties. From TeX S.E ...


8

This is purely speculation, but is the most probable based on other events: You get serially upvoted for +150. You spend it all on a bounty. It is reversed. You get -150 rep, but you have 1, and since rep can't go below 1, you still have 1 rep. A mod refunds the bounty. You now temporarily have 151 rep. Your rep is recalculated, and now you have 1 again. [I'...


7

This is a noble initiative, but it is not sustainable since reputation is an earned attribute and it's not in everyone to just doll it out at the drop of a new user. Of course, some folks do, but the majority of folks don't. Additionally the request for updating a "vote-to-delete reason" should be consistent network-wide. The critical part within this quote ...


7

In my opinion, the easy answer is that there is little benefit in doing this. The following points come to mind (mostly taken from How does the bounty system work?): You mentioned this already, but if you allow people to increase an existing bounty, you most certainly will have users wanted to lower it, stating that they mistakenly issued a too-high bounty ...


7

While there is no way for mods to transfer bounties between recipients, one option is to ping the user in chat and explain the situation*. Chat rooms are a great way to connect to people directly, even in a group session on TeX, LaTeX and Friends. Alternatively, invite them to a private chat room. Another approach would be to "suck it up" and find another ...


7

This is one of the privileges of asking a question. It allows you to decide which answer helped you most. Like voting, your decision-making process doesn't have to be disclosed. My suggestion would be that if neither answer addresses your question in its entirety that you request more clarification or improvement from those who posted answers. If no answer ...


7

Asking is free, so you can definitely inquire. Either comment on your own question (requires no reputation if you're the owner), start up a conversation in chat (requires 20 reputation) or comment on an existing post that matches your requirements yet you're not the owner (requires 50 reputation). Sometimes, with an informal agreement between members in ...


7

The unfortunate thing about bounties are that they are irreversible. Once issued, it's an immediate withdrawal from your reputation bank. At best, the bounty adds more attention to your question by bumping it to the top of the active questions list, as well as the featured questions tab. At worst, no additional interest is shown at the end of the bounty ...


6

It didn't fit in the comment so pasting it here for the question specifics. The question is missing a few ingredients. First one is that I don't understand the idea of a cross section of a line. It would just be dots. Do you mean that or something else? Second we don't have the data. So we can't try anything. That means we can't try stuff out. However a ...


6

Mods can't reverse bounties. This will have to be raised with the StackExchange staff: presumably it is doable with direct access to the 'back end': use the Contact Us form to do this.


6

From https://stackoverflow.com/help/bounty: A bounty can be started on a question two days after the question was asked. The question you want to award a bounty for was posted on 2015-08-22 at 20:45:40Z, now it's 2015-08-24 at 13:41Z. You'll be able to start a bounty in 7 hours. There is no requirement for the question to be unanswered (one bounty ...


5

No. You can award more than one bounty on a question, so if they are to reward existing answers you can make that clear.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible