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33

Yes, this is definitely possible. When you offer a bounty, you get to choose from a number of possible "bounty reasons", with one of them being Reward existing answer One or more of the answers is exemplary and worthy of an additional bounty. There is a 24 hour waiting period, but then you can assign the bounty to whichever answer you choose.


26

It's not refunded because you got the benefit that your question was visible for 7 days on the featured tab. You gave the bounty for getting attention, and you got it. It's not a payment for an answer. Even if an answerer can possibly win it. If it would be refunded, you could keep questions featured forever, without additionally spending points, placing ...


19

I say go for a bounty! As you can see, there are a lot of questions on this site, and if a stream get asked in relatively quick succession then your (or, indeed, anyone's) question can get lost in the flood. Bounties can be awarded for a number of different reasons: you need a solution to the problem and your question has been buried by the most recent ...


19

Technically, a bounty may be reversed or cancelled, if it can be justified... However, the bounty systems acts like an advertisement in the real world. You pay for something to entice visitors/viewers, but there is no guarantee that such an investment will result in people buying more of your product. In a similar vein - the non-real SE world - there is no ...


18

Well, regarding point 1, if you post the bounty on your own question, then, if it is upvoted a lot, you will get a good chunk of rep from that which might well pay back some of the bounty. For example, if you post a 50 points bounty and the question then shoots straight to the top of the homepage and spends a weak on the featured tab, it could easily get 5 ...


17

The reason the step is not very small (say 1) is almost certainly to prevent 'gaming'. The idea of bounties is to give questions a temporary 'boost'. As it stands, you can only do that by using a reasonable amount of rep and having this increase quite rapidly: if you want to bounty a question more than once it gets (relatively) 'expensive'. On the other hand,...


17

Because it is not important. If SE headmasters chose a different sequence that the one we have, it wouldn't change anything. How many people care whether the bounty is 50 or 64, or whether it is 1729 or 2000? It's the scale that show how important it is for you as the offerrer, and not the actual number. Just don't take rep points too seriously and you'll be ...


17

The answer to this is that there is no reputation system on this Meta site to award bounties, and therefore considered by-design. Bounties are only meaningful in an environment where reputation is available to be gained and distributed (through voting, but also bounties). Here on Meta, it does not exist. In fact, your "reputation" on meta is equivalent to ...


15

I don't see a question in the question, so how about an answer without an answer. ;-) Seriously, I suggest be bold and go ahead, offer the bounty. Reputation is just some score, but this way you could directly benefit from it. Even if you invest those 11%, 50 points, it's easy to get it back! While I know, earning reputation by answering can be hard, you ...


14

If you care about reputation, chances are high you also care about badges. So take comfort in the fact that by assigning the first bounty to one of your own questions you'll earn the Promoter badge and possibly also the Benefactor badge. ;-)


14

What about adding an "I'm having that problem too" button? The button could disappear as soon as an answer is accepted. In the meantime, if a question has enough "I'm having that problem" votes (more than 5, say), accepted answers could come with an bonus (and the bonus could increase with the number of votes). This would be similar to a bounty, but wouldn't ...


12

You can't assign more than one bounty to a question at a time. From the Bounty Help: Questions may only have one active question bounty at any given time. Note that you can have more than one active bounty, but these have to be assigned to different questions: Users may only have three active bounties at any given time.


11

You do not have enough reputation to add another bounty. You added a 250 rep bounty on December 5th. For you to add another one, you must double the reputation. You do not have 500 reputation to offer such a bounty.


11

They don't want to have the pranks related to putting the bounty and after having the interest pulling it back. Rep points don't mean anyth.... anyways, that's why.


11

No. Bounties are there to give questions additional exposure and are removed from the 'donors' reputation at the point they are set up. Even if the question involved does not gain any answers as a result, the bounty is not returned to the donor. The question will have been 'promoted' by the bounty (there is a dedicated bounty list which is much smaller than ...


10

You have awarded the following bounties already on the post in question: 500 reputation to Gonzalo Medina 500 reputation to Yiannis Lazarides 500 reputation to commonhare 500 reputation to Sam Whited 500 reputation to dcmst 500 reputation to ChrisS 500 reputation to Paul Gessler 1,000 reputation to OSjerick 500 reputation to Thérèse 500 reputation to mrc 2,...


10

Despite the fact that I'm sure all my answers are worth bounties, it seems that the only way to move bounties is for the allegedly undeserving recipient to award a bounty of an equivalent amount to the allegedly more deserving recipient. Accordingly I have started a bounty on the referenced question and will award it once the system allows, later today.


10

If you have already given an answer of your own to a question, the minimum bounty is 100. See: How does the bounty system work? for a full discussion.


10

I don't want to sound harsh, but bounty is not a way to give reputation to a user for any different reason than the answer which is awarded the bounty. If the problem is that bounty of 500 seems not enough for that particular case (and the offerrer wants to give more reputation to one particular answer), the offerrer can make a feature request to increase ...


10

If I were in your shoes I would probably also invest. :) Maybe the answers you receive will be marginally helpful in solving the actual problem, but you can also have a pleasant surprise of getting exactly what you wanted. Now, beside the fact that this is a real gamble and that you get your investment back in a way or another (rep points/badges), I would ...


9

From https://tex.stackexchange.com/privileges/set-bounties – When does a bounty expire? If you do not award the bounty within 24 hours of the bounty period ending, half the bounty value will be automatically be awarded to the top voted answer posted after the bounty start, provided it has a score of at least 2. If no new answer matches this ...


9

First of all...Hi! I'm Laura, a product manager at Stack Exchange. The rationale behind having bounty reasons be displayed along with the bounty amount is to help other users know what they should do in order to receive the bounty. You're right about the general reason that bounties exist: people want to do whatever it takes to get an answer. However, since ...


8

This is purely speculation, but is the most probable based on other events: You get serially upvoted for +150. You spend it all on a bounty. It is reversed. You get -150 rep, but you have 1, and since rep can't go below 1, you still have 1 rep. A mod refunds the bounty. You now temporarily have 151 rep. Your rep is recalculated, and now you have 1 again. [I'...


8

I think that is really all up to you. If it is something that is important to you, or if you think would be important for a larger audience you should do so. I don't think most of the people here are going to try to answer something just because it has a bounty, but having a bounty does attract more attention to question, as then it is considered something ...


8

Perusing the link you provided, it seems that the OP would have been allowed to award the bounty to an "old" answer (i.e., one that existed at the time the bounty was created). However, in case the OP doesn't choose any answer, half the bounty will be awarded automatically to the highest-scoring "new" answer with a score of at least 2. So yes, this is a case ...


7

I'd do like this: give the "hard", answer the bounty, and accept the complete answer. This is completely fair and valid -- you don't have to award the bounty to the highest-voted answer, or to accept the bounty-rewarded answer. Not possible under current Stack Exchange rules. You would probably find much more information about bounties here (bounty-...


7

I would like to say that (as been said by Andrew before), you can get helped in the chat too. Trust me, it works! And especially if the package maintainer is a member here (like in the case of Martin), this might be in the end the best way to contact him.


7

In my opinion, the easy answer is that there is little benefit in doing this. The following points come to mind (mostly taken from How does the bounty system work?): You mentioned this already, but if you allow people to increase an existing bounty, you most certainly will have users wanted to lower it, stating that they mistakenly issued a too-high bounty ...


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