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Welcome to TeX.SE! you accept an answer by clicking on the green checkmark next to the answer. Voting up good answers is a way of saying it is a good answer, but there can be many good answers, but only one accepted answer. Thanks for caring! Here's what an unaccepted and an accepted answer looks like: and here's that same answer before and after an ...


32

An "accepted answer" is one that is the most helpful to you. Being helpful, can include the useful information that you should not waste your time on this because what you are trying is impossible. Thus it may well be appropriate to accept such an answer.


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Experience suggests that a lot of 'newer' users will add comments such as 'That solved my problem' or 'Thanks' to answers. As the voting/accepting mechanism is the 'visible' way that this can be done on the site, it's desirable that they know this. At the same time, experience also suggests that many people visit the site only to solve their specific ...


25

Officially the OP should accept the answer which was the most useful to him/her. This doesn't always need to be the most technically correct answer. However, this can be helpful for other people who have the same issue. There can be multiple "correct" answers, even if they are different. They should of course all be up-voted. It is OK for the asker to change ...


24

I think it makes sense to separate them even though they overlap in many cases. Quoted from Meta Stack Overflow: An answer may indeed solve or help you solve your original problem, but it might not be an otherwise "good" answer. The accepting and up-voting are different actions which mean different things. There are however ways to improve. Way may ...


23

The issue can be often be solved in advance by simply not accepting the first answer right away. Instead the questioner should wait at least a couple of hours if not a day until the answer is accepted. This way other people have a chance to give an answer as well. Another thing is when a new answer is given after a longer period of time. It happens that ...


23

If the accepted answer is provably wrong, it seems fine to add a comment saying so. But the comment IMO should be aimed at the answerer, not the questioner, and the answerer should suggest unaccepting the answer if that's the case. But if your opinion is that another answer is better, then again, it's fine to add a comment to that answer saying something ...


21

Here is a timeline of how things changed on this site since 2011 (I used a year-specific extraction of a data query). More specifically, it shows the cumulative questions and accepted answers as well as this ratio (or percentage) as the site grows: With accepted Questions answers Percentage Growth 2011 13108 ...


19

Using the Advanced Super Ninja Search Options, you can search for user:10827 hasaccepted:0 closed:0 sorted by "newest". This searches TeX.SX for posts by User 10827 (you) that has no accepted answer (hasaccepted:0) and is not closed (closed:0), filtered according to the posted date. Currently there are 5 such questions (see below). You can as well add the ...


19

Let's assume the real problems are not with your query (say, unclear wording) but solely with the answer you accepted prematurely, before you discovered the flaws. Before un-accepting that answer, I believe that sheer politeness and good manners require leaving a comment first, detailing the flaws you've discovered and asking the answer-giver if it's ...


18

Ultimately, which answer is accepted is down to you, so in a sense you decide on this. That said, I would normally expect to wait 24 h after posting a question to see if there are multiple answers. Once a question is marked as 'accepted', there will be slightly less interest in checking it over from other users. At the same time, remember that you can change ...


17

There's another difference between upvoting and accepting: After a short "grace" period, an upvote can't be undone (unless the upvoted answer has been edited). In contrast, an accepted answer can be "un-accepted" any time later. (A valid reason for doing so is that a new "late" answer supersedes the previously accepted one.)


17

No. Accepting an answer is purely the decision of the person asking the question, and does not have to reflect what others feel is the 'best' answer. It simply is a way of saying that it is the answer which helped the person asking the question the most. Of course, this can mean that a question with a good answer never gets an accepted answer: that is '...


16

The accepted answer is the one of 'most use to the original questioner'. As such, it is really down to you which one you take: it's quite reasonable to move the tick. You might of course want to explain why, for example in a comment on the answer you 'unaccept'. It's worth noting that the fact that the tick is down to the questioner alone means that it's ...


15

One thing I didn't realise when I started here is that one can unaccept an answer and then accept a new one. So I would suggest accepting the "impossible" answer, assuming it is credible (for the reasons Andrew Swann gives); if a solution does turn up later, you can always accept that instead.


15

If I'm ever to get an Unsung Hero badge it needs lots of zero score accepted answers.


15

The answerers know that you can only accept one answer; they shouldn’t mind when you do so. On english.stackexchange, I’ve been an answerer in this scenario many times, and I’ve never seen anyone unhappy when one answer among two or several good ones was accepted. If you like, a comment like “Thankyou, this [was very helpful/works fine/is a useful ...


15

Either select the answer that benefits the community the most (according to your opinion), hoping that future visitors to your question will find meaning in your choice; or select the answer that helped you most (based on your situation). Users who visit your post in the future should use their own judgement (and voting) to corroborate choices or find ...


14

To reward both answers you could up-vote both, accept the answer that address your question precisely, and award a 50 points bounty to the other solution. When you choose award a bounty you can choose as motivation "Reward existing answer", then you wait until you can reward the bounty and you give it to the answer you want to reward.


14

Sorry I missed this request. I have adjusted the contrast between the checkmark's on and off state significantly. This change will be in the next production build.


14

I don't think this is a good idea (not to mention it is unlikely to ever be implemented by the Stackexchange powers that be). First, as has been mentioned in the comments, accepting an answer is not the same as upvoting an answer, so when you accept an answer (even your own) no vote it conferred. Consequently, you can't ever vote for your own answer, but ...


14

This varies and depends on a number of circumstances. I'll reflect on a couple from personal experience: You're too slow to respond. The OP doesn't wait long enough for you to respond and asks a new follow-up question before you can get around smoothing out anything further to help. You forget. This happens, believe it or not. Some days/weeks are more ...


13

Associated with accepting an answer (clicking on the arrow below the voting buttons) is an added bonus - reputation! If you read the main site FAQ entry on What is reputation?, you'll note that when accepting an answer, the acceptor receives +2 in reputation.


12

I think we don't need to choose and to modify one answer as "accepted". Beside that it's not real, we've already got the community acceptance by votes: the best answer has been voted up. A question with upvoted answers doesn't count as "unanswered". However, if we see an orphaned question with a good answer but without upvotes, I encourage upvoting the ...


12

Pretty much by definition you should accept the answer that helped you the most. If that answer is your own answer then you should accept that. Thus your attitude against accepting your own answer is against the spirit of the site. Note that you can never upvote your own question and won't get any +rep from accepting your own answer. You might however get ...


12

In the case at hand, you simply couldn't delete you answer unless the OP revoked his acceptance before. IMO, you also shouldn't delete it because it shows an alternative approach that may be useful for other users (who may face not quite the same, but a similar problem in the future). "Disciplining" yourself rather is a proper course of action if you and ...


12

Definitely go for the one that was the most helpful to you. The faq say: When you have decided which answer is the most helpful to you, mark it as the accepted answer by clicking on the check box outline to the left of the answer. accept an answer http://cdn.sstatic.net/img/faq/faq-accept-answer.png This lets other people know that you have ...


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As https://meta.stackexchange.com/a/143432/163868 describes you can find them by searching. Use the search term hasaccepted:0 to only find questions with no accepted answer, answers:1 to only find questions with at least one answer and use user:me to only find posts by you, i.e. search for hasaccepted:0 answers:1 user:me You can also use a user id instead ...


12

As per Paul Gaborit comment: Some people might prefer answering in comments, Refer why do people answer in comments for more reasons. Hence one can comment to the @person-who-suggested-correct-comment to convert his comment to answer and wait for a while. Incase of no response, post the comment as community wiki answer to remove from unanswered list As ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible