3 Added a link to a concrete example.
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Since that happened to me a few times, I am wondering how to deal with the following question. A user asks a question, gets an answer, seems to be happy with it, and accepts it. Some time later, (s)he changes her or his mind, and wants some additional feature. (The "some time later" part is important here, I am not talking about some immediate requests.) Then the user would "unaccept" the answer, and only accept it again if the additional request is met.

EDIT: Here is a concrete example for such a living question. (I stress that I do not want to criticize the OP, who is a rather new user and asks very interesting and clear questions. However, what I do want to achieve is that the unacceptance of egregs nice answer gets reversed, and that the additional requirements become part of a new question. Egreg's answer in its current form will be useful for many.) In this example, a question got asked, an excellent answer was given, and accepted. So far, so good. The unfortunate part is that the answer got unaccepted later and the question got extended.

There are several reasons why I don't like that.

  1. The original question may be of interest for other users. Modifying it later to become considerably different will erase some potentially useful information.
  2. The user has lower chances that her or his new request will be addressed because updated question is not at the top of the list. Only the answerer will know immediately about this question.
  3. I can't see a reason why someone would do that. After all, the questions are free.

My question is how to deal with such situations. One way to go would be some sort of agreement that no one will answer such questions. I'm pretty confident that this would prevent the situations described above.

Main question: how should one deal with such situations?

Since that happened to me a few times, I am wondering how to deal with the following question. A user asks a question, gets an answer, seems to be happy with it, and accepts it. Some time later, (s)he changes her or his mind, and wants some additional feature. (The "some time later" part is important here, I am not talking about some immediate requests.) Then the user would "unaccept" the answer, and only accept it again if the additional request is met.

There are several reasons why I don't like that.

  1. The original question may be of interest for other users. Modifying it later to become considerably different will erase some potentially useful information.
  2. The user has lower chances that her or his new request will be addressed because updated question is not at the top of the list. Only the answerer will know immediately about this question.
  3. I can't see a reason why someone would do that. After all, the questions are free.

My question is how to deal with such situations. One way to go would be some sort of agreement that no one will answer such questions. I'm pretty confident that this would prevent the situations described above.

Main question: how should one deal with such situations?

Since that happened to me a few times, I am wondering how to deal with the following question. A user asks a question, gets an answer, seems to be happy with it, and accepts it. Some time later, (s)he changes her or his mind, and wants some additional feature. (The "some time later" part is important here, I am not talking about some immediate requests.) Then the user would "unaccept" the answer, and only accept it again if the additional request is met.

EDIT: Here is a concrete example for such a living question. (I stress that I do not want to criticize the OP, who is a rather new user and asks very interesting and clear questions. However, what I do want to achieve is that the unacceptance of egregs nice answer gets reversed, and that the additional requirements become part of a new question. Egreg's answer in its current form will be useful for many.) In this example, a question got asked, an excellent answer was given, and accepted. So far, so good. The unfortunate part is that the answer got unaccepted later and the question got extended.

There are several reasons why I don't like that.

  1. The original question may be of interest for other users. Modifying it later to become considerably different will erase some potentially useful information.
  2. The user has lower chances that her or his new request will be addressed because updated question is not at the top of the list. Only the answerer will know immediately about this question.
  3. I can't see a reason why someone would do that. After all, the questions are free.

My question is how to deal with such situations. One way to go would be some sort of agreement that no one will answer such questions. I'm pretty confident that this would prevent the situations described above.

Main question: how should one deal with such situations?

2 added 1 character in body
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Since that happened to me a few times, I am wondering how to deal with the following question. A user asks a question, gets an answer, seems to be happy with it, and accepts it. Some time later, (s)he changes her or ishis mind, and wants some additional feature. (The "some time later" part is important here, I am not talking about some immediate requests.) Then the user would "unaccept" the answer, and only accept it again if the additional request is met.

There are several reasons why I don't like that.

  1. The original question may be of interest for other users. Modifying it later to become considerably different will erase some potentially useful information.
  2. The user has lower chances that her or his new request will be addressed because updated question is not at the top of the list. Only the answerer will know immediately about this question.
  3. I can't see a reason why someone would do that. After all, the questions are free.

My question is how to deal with such situations. One way to go would be some sort of agreement that no one will answer such questions. I'm pretty confident that this would prevent the situations described above.

Main question: how should one deal with such situations?

Since that happened to me a few times, I am wondering how to deal with the following question. A user asks a question, gets an answer, seems to be happy with it, and accepts it. Some time later, (s)he changes her or is mind, and wants some additional feature. (The "some time later" part is important here, I am not talking about some immediate requests.) Then the user would "unaccept" the answer, and only accept it again if the additional request is met.

There are several reasons why I don't like that.

  1. The original question may be of interest for other users. Modifying it later to become considerably different will erase some potentially useful information.
  2. The user has lower chances that her or his new request will be addressed because updated question is not at the top of the list. Only the answerer will know immediately about this question.
  3. I can't see a reason why someone would do that. After all, the questions are free.

My question is how to deal with such situations. One way to go would be some sort of agreement that no one will answer such questions. I'm pretty confident that this would prevent the situations described above.

Main question: how should one deal with such situations?

Since that happened to me a few times, I am wondering how to deal with the following question. A user asks a question, gets an answer, seems to be happy with it, and accepts it. Some time later, (s)he changes her or his mind, and wants some additional feature. (The "some time later" part is important here, I am not talking about some immediate requests.) Then the user would "unaccept" the answer, and only accept it again if the additional request is met.

There are several reasons why I don't like that.

  1. The original question may be of interest for other users. Modifying it later to become considerably different will erase some potentially useful information.
  2. The user has lower chances that her or his new request will be addressed because updated question is not at the top of the list. Only the answerer will know immediately about this question.
  3. I can't see a reason why someone would do that. After all, the questions are free.

My question is how to deal with such situations. One way to go would be some sort of agreement that no one will answer such questions. I'm pretty confident that this would prevent the situations described above.

Main question: how should one deal with such situations?

1
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How to deal with "living" or "evolving" questions?

Since that happened to me a few times, I am wondering how to deal with the following question. A user asks a question, gets an answer, seems to be happy with it, and accepts it. Some time later, (s)he changes her or is mind, and wants some additional feature. (The "some time later" part is important here, I am not talking about some immediate requests.) Then the user would "unaccept" the answer, and only accept it again if the additional request is met.

There are several reasons why I don't like that.

  1. The original question may be of interest for other users. Modifying it later to become considerably different will erase some potentially useful information.
  2. The user has lower chances that her or his new request will be addressed because updated question is not at the top of the list. Only the answerer will know immediately about this question.
  3. I can't see a reason why someone would do that. After all, the questions are free.

My question is how to deal with such situations. One way to go would be some sort of agreement that no one will answer such questions. I'm pretty confident that this would prevent the situations described above.

Main question: how should one deal with such situations?