4 replaced http://meta.stackexchange.com/ with https://meta.stackexchange.com/
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The question was automatically deleted - something that happens to low-activity postssomething that happens to low-activity posts. You have the option of voting to undelete the post (from the linked answerlinked answer):


How can I undelete one of my posts?

Self-deleted posts can be viewed, edited, and undeleted by their original authors.

Note: deleted questions do not appear in search results, so you if you wish to later undelete a question that you've deleted you must have saved the URL somewhere. Users with 10K reputation and up can also mark questions as a "favorite" and find them later from the Favorites tab on their profiles.

If your post was deleted by trusted users, it will require three undelete votes to be undeleted - politely asking for this on Meta may attract the necessary votes if you make a good case for why the question should be restored.

If your post was deleted by a moderator, you can flag one of your other posts and write a note in the "other" section explaining the situation and requesting undeletion.


However, from the likes of it, this doesn't seem like a problem at all. Someone in a similar boat may just wait that little bit longer and not experience the "problem" at all. Reasons for undeleting a post should include a consideration for whether the post (question and answer) would be useful for a broader audience. In my opinion, this is not really the case.

The question was automatically deleted - something that happens to low-activity posts. You have the option of voting to undelete the post (from the linked answer):


How can I undelete one of my posts?

Self-deleted posts can be viewed, edited, and undeleted by their original authors.

Note: deleted questions do not appear in search results, so you if you wish to later undelete a question that you've deleted you must have saved the URL somewhere. Users with 10K reputation and up can also mark questions as a "favorite" and find them later from the Favorites tab on their profiles.

If your post was deleted by trusted users, it will require three undelete votes to be undeleted - politely asking for this on Meta may attract the necessary votes if you make a good case for why the question should be restored.

If your post was deleted by a moderator, you can flag one of your other posts and write a note in the "other" section explaining the situation and requesting undeletion.


However, from the likes of it, this doesn't seem like a problem at all. Someone in a similar boat may just wait that little bit longer and not experience the "problem" at all. Reasons for undeleting a post should include a consideration for whether the post (question and answer) would be useful for a broader audience. In my opinion, this is not really the case.

The question was automatically deleted - something that happens to low-activity posts. You have the option of voting to undelete the post (from the linked answer):


How can I undelete one of my posts?

Self-deleted posts can be viewed, edited, and undeleted by their original authors.

Note: deleted questions do not appear in search results, so you if you wish to later undelete a question that you've deleted you must have saved the URL somewhere. Users with 10K reputation and up can also mark questions as a "favorite" and find them later from the Favorites tab on their profiles.

If your post was deleted by trusted users, it will require three undelete votes to be undeleted - politely asking for this on Meta may attract the necessary votes if you make a good case for why the question should be restored.

If your post was deleted by a moderator, you can flag one of your other posts and write a note in the "other" section explaining the situation and requesting undeletion.


However, from the likes of it, this doesn't seem like a problem at all. Someone in a similar boat may just wait that little bit longer and not experience the "problem" at all. Reasons for undeleting a post should include a consideration for whether the post (question and answer) would be useful for a broader audience. In my opinion, this is not really the case.

3 replaced http://meta.tex.stackexchange.com/ with https://tex.meta.stackexchange.com/
source | link
2 replaced http://meta.tex.stackexchange.com/ with https://tex.meta.stackexchange.com/
source | link

The question was automatically deleted - something that happens to low-activity posts. You have the option of voting to undelete the post (from the linked answer):


How can I undelete one of my posts?

Self-deleted posts can be viewed, edited, and undeleted by their original authors.

Note: deleted questions do not appear in search results, so you if you wish to later undelete a question that you've deleted you must have saved the URL somewhere. Users with 10K reputation and up can also mark questions as a "favorite" and find them later from the Favorites tab on their profiles.

If your post was deleted by trusted userstrusted users, it will require three undelete votes to be undeleted - politely asking for this on Meta may attract the necessary votes if you make a good case for why the question should be restored.

If your post was deleted by a moderator, you can flag one of your other posts and write a note in the "other" section explaining the situation and requesting undeletion.


However, from the likes of it, this doesn't seem like a problem at all. Someone in a similar boat may just wait that little bit longer and not experience the "problem" at all. Reasons for undeleting a post should include a consideration for whether the post (question and answer) would be useful for a broader audience. In my opinion, this is not really the case.

The question was automatically deleted - something that happens to low-activity posts. You have the option of voting to undelete the post (from the linked answer):


How can I undelete one of my posts?

Self-deleted posts can be viewed, edited, and undeleted by their original authors.

Note: deleted questions do not appear in search results, so you if you wish to later undelete a question that you've deleted you must have saved the URL somewhere. Users with 10K reputation and up can also mark questions as a "favorite" and find them later from the Favorites tab on their profiles.

If your post was deleted by trusted users, it will require three undelete votes to be undeleted - politely asking for this on Meta may attract the necessary votes if you make a good case for why the question should be restored.

If your post was deleted by a moderator, you can flag one of your other posts and write a note in the "other" section explaining the situation and requesting undeletion.


However, from the likes of it, this doesn't seem like a problem at all. Someone in a similar boat may just wait that little bit longer and not experience the "problem" at all. Reasons for undeleting a post should include a consideration for whether the post (question and answer) would be useful for a broader audience. In my opinion, this is not really the case.

The question was automatically deleted - something that happens to low-activity posts. You have the option of voting to undelete the post (from the linked answer):


How can I undelete one of my posts?

Self-deleted posts can be viewed, edited, and undeleted by their original authors.

Note: deleted questions do not appear in search results, so you if you wish to later undelete a question that you've deleted you must have saved the URL somewhere. Users with 10K reputation and up can also mark questions as a "favorite" and find them later from the Favorites tab on their profiles.

If your post was deleted by trusted users, it will require three undelete votes to be undeleted - politely asking for this on Meta may attract the necessary votes if you make a good case for why the question should be restored.

If your post was deleted by a moderator, you can flag one of your other posts and write a note in the "other" section explaining the situation and requesting undeletion.


However, from the likes of it, this doesn't seem like a problem at all. Someone in a similar boat may just wait that little bit longer and not experience the "problem" at all. Reasons for undeleting a post should include a consideration for whether the post (question and answer) would be useful for a broader audience. In my opinion, this is not really the case.

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