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Making new users feel welcome is very important, and we've discussed beforediscussed before steps to avoid putting them off. At the same time, we want to encourage new users to follow the correct Q&A approach here. That shows up most commonly when a users posts an 'answer' to a question which is either a new question, is really a comment or does not really fully answer the question. Often, these 'non-answers' get flagged for moderation, and it's then up to the mod team to take appropriate action.

The approach that has been taken on TeX.sx to date in dealing with flagged questions is somewhat different from other parts of the StackExchange network. This became apparent after a meta postmeta post and some chat discussion yesterday. It's therefore important to understand the two approaches, before considering whether we should modify what we do.

The current TeX.sx approach works broadly as follows. When an answer is flagged, the moderators of course take a look at it. Assuming it falls into the 'non-answers' category I've outlined above, either a mod or some other 'involved' user leaves a message to the poster. These are usually modelled on those from the building blocksbuilding blocks page, for example

Welcome to TeX.sx!Welcome to TeX.sx! Your question won't be seen by many people here so it would be best to repost it as a fresh question. Follow-up questions like this are more than welcome! Please use the "Ask Question" link for your new question; there you can link to this question to provide the background.

or

Instead of posting a “Thank you” as an additional answer, you should thank [user] by upvoting [his/her] answer (with the upward pointing arrow to the left of it; you need 15 reputation points before you can upvote) and accepting it (by clicking on the checkmark). We want to keep the answer space reserved for actual answers, so this non-answer will be removed from public view soon.

The flag is then left 'on' as a bookmark, and the OP is given about a day to return to the site and make a change themselves. If after 24 h nothing has happened, then the mods do remove the item from public view, convert to a comment, or whatever seems most appropriate.

The more general StackExchange model starts in the same way: see flag, look at 'answer', consider its status. The next step in the SE approach is again to leave a comment, but then to immediately remove the 'answer' from public view. The idea is that the user will still get a notification, via the global inbox, of the comment, but that this will be (almost) a private message as the only people who can see the comment will be +10k users. As well as avoiding any look of 'criticism' in public, the idea is that this approach scales to very large numbers of issues.

So what I'd like to invite as answers here is views on the relative merits of the two approaches, in particular seen from the POV of a new user.

Making new users feel welcome is very important, and we've discussed before steps to avoid putting them off. At the same time, we want to encourage new users to follow the correct Q&A approach here. That shows up most commonly when a users posts an 'answer' to a question which is either a new question, is really a comment or does not really fully answer the question. Often, these 'non-answers' get flagged for moderation, and it's then up to the mod team to take appropriate action.

The approach that has been taken on TeX.sx to date in dealing with flagged questions is somewhat different from other parts of the StackExchange network. This became apparent after a meta post and some chat discussion yesterday. It's therefore important to understand the two approaches, before considering whether we should modify what we do.

The current TeX.sx approach works broadly as follows. When an answer is flagged, the moderators of course take a look at it. Assuming it falls into the 'non-answers' category I've outlined above, either a mod or some other 'involved' user leaves a message to the poster. These are usually modelled on those from the building blocks page, for example

Welcome to TeX.sx! Your question won't be seen by many people here so it would be best to repost it as a fresh question. Follow-up questions like this are more than welcome! Please use the "Ask Question" link for your new question; there you can link to this question to provide the background.

or

Instead of posting a “Thank you” as an additional answer, you should thank [user] by upvoting [his/her] answer (with the upward pointing arrow to the left of it; you need 15 reputation points before you can upvote) and accepting it (by clicking on the checkmark). We want to keep the answer space reserved for actual answers, so this non-answer will be removed from public view soon.

The flag is then left 'on' as a bookmark, and the OP is given about a day to return to the site and make a change themselves. If after 24 h nothing has happened, then the mods do remove the item from public view, convert to a comment, or whatever seems most appropriate.

The more general StackExchange model starts in the same way: see flag, look at 'answer', consider its status. The next step in the SE approach is again to leave a comment, but then to immediately remove the 'answer' from public view. The idea is that the user will still get a notification, via the global inbox, of the comment, but that this will be (almost) a private message as the only people who can see the comment will be +10k users. As well as avoiding any look of 'criticism' in public, the idea is that this approach scales to very large numbers of issues.

So what I'd like to invite as answers here is views on the relative merits of the two approaches, in particular seen from the POV of a new user.

Making new users feel welcome is very important, and we've discussed before steps to avoid putting them off. At the same time, we want to encourage new users to follow the correct Q&A approach here. That shows up most commonly when a users posts an 'answer' to a question which is either a new question, is really a comment or does not really fully answer the question. Often, these 'non-answers' get flagged for moderation, and it's then up to the mod team to take appropriate action.

The approach that has been taken on TeX.sx to date in dealing with flagged questions is somewhat different from other parts of the StackExchange network. This became apparent after a meta post and some chat discussion yesterday. It's therefore important to understand the two approaches, before considering whether we should modify what we do.

The current TeX.sx approach works broadly as follows. When an answer is flagged, the moderators of course take a look at it. Assuming it falls into the 'non-answers' category I've outlined above, either a mod or some other 'involved' user leaves a message to the poster. These are usually modelled on those from the building blocks page, for example

Welcome to TeX.sx! Your question won't be seen by many people here so it would be best to repost it as a fresh question. Follow-up questions like this are more than welcome! Please use the "Ask Question" link for your new question; there you can link to this question to provide the background.

or

Instead of posting a “Thank you” as an additional answer, you should thank [user] by upvoting [his/her] answer (with the upward pointing arrow to the left of it; you need 15 reputation points before you can upvote) and accepting it (by clicking on the checkmark). We want to keep the answer space reserved for actual answers, so this non-answer will be removed from public view soon.

The flag is then left 'on' as a bookmark, and the OP is given about a day to return to the site and make a change themselves. If after 24 h nothing has happened, then the mods do remove the item from public view, convert to a comment, or whatever seems most appropriate.

The more general StackExchange model starts in the same way: see flag, look at 'answer', consider its status. The next step in the SE approach is again to leave a comment, but then to immediately remove the 'answer' from public view. The idea is that the user will still get a notification, via the global inbox, of the comment, but that this will be (almost) a private message as the only people who can see the comment will be +10k users. As well as avoiding any look of 'criticism' in public, the idea is that this approach scales to very large numbers of issues.

So what I'd like to invite as answers here is views on the relative merits of the two approaches, in particular seen from the POV of a new user.

    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackTeX/status/120303796311162880
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Handling 'non-answers' from new(-ish) users

Making new users feel welcome is very important, and we've discussed before steps to avoid putting them off. At the same time, we want to encourage new users to follow the correct Q&A approach here. That shows up most commonly when a users posts an 'answer' to a question which is either a new question, is really a comment or does not really fully answer the question. Often, these 'non-answers' get flagged for moderation, and it's then up to the mod team to take appropriate action.

The approach that has been taken on TeX.sx to date in dealing with flagged questions is somewhat different from other parts of the StackExchange network. This became apparent after a meta post and some chat discussion yesterday. It's therefore important to understand the two approaches, before considering whether we should modify what we do.

The current TeX.sx approach works broadly as follows. When an answer is flagged, the moderators of course take a look at it. Assuming it falls into the 'non-answers' category I've outlined above, either a mod or some other 'involved' user leaves a message to the poster. These are usually modelled on those from the building blocks page, for example

Welcome to TeX.sx! Your question won't be seen by many people here so it would be best to repost it as a fresh question. Follow-up questions like this are more than welcome! Please use the "Ask Question" link for your new question; there you can link to this question to provide the background.

or

Instead of posting a “Thank you” as an additional answer, you should thank [user] by upvoting [his/her] answer (with the upward pointing arrow to the left of it; you need 15 reputation points before you can upvote) and accepting it (by clicking on the checkmark). We want to keep the answer space reserved for actual answers, so this non-answer will be removed from public view soon.

The flag is then left 'on' as a bookmark, and the OP is given about a day to return to the site and make a change themselves. If after 24 h nothing has happened, then the mods do remove the item from public view, convert to a comment, or whatever seems most appropriate.

The more general StackExchange model starts in the same way: see flag, look at 'answer', consider its status. The next step in the SE approach is again to leave a comment, but then to immediately remove the 'answer' from public view. The idea is that the user will still get a notification, via the global inbox, of the comment, but that this will be (almost) a private message as the only people who can see the comment will be +10k users. As well as avoiding any look of 'criticism' in public, the idea is that this approach scales to very large numbers of issues.

So what I'd like to invite as answers here is views on the relative merits of the two approaches, in particular seen from the POV of a new user.